Hoodoo Voodoo Lounge, Brian Setzer Fans
 
HomeHome  FAQFAQ  RegisterRegister  Log inLog in  

Share | 
 

 Lonely Avenue Article

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
Go to page : 1, 2  Next
AuthorMessage
Rickabilly

avatar

Posts : 948
Join date : 2008-04-17

PostSubject: Lonely Avenue Article   Thu Oct 08, 2009 11:00 am

I love it when I find a Setzer article in the mainstream media!

A Dark 'Lonely Avenue' Turn for Stray Cat Setzer

And since I'm usually too lazy to click on links (though the link does have a photo):

By JEFF BAENEN, Associated Press Writer Jeff Baenen, Associated Press Writer – 19 mins ago

MINNEAPOLIS – Brian Setzer can't keep his fingers still. When he talks about his new CD "Songs From Lonely Avenue," he has to grab his bright orange Gretsch guitar and start firing off the edgy riffs that make up his film noir tribute.

"It always starts with the guitar riff," Setzer said, pausing after playing the slinky intro to "King of the Whole Damn World," which veers from rockabilly to jazz, and singing in a soft, high voice.

The three-time Grammy winner recalls first coming up with one of the riffs and thinking, "That's really cool, that's kind of dark." It sounded like a soundtrack, Setzer said.

"So I got that idea — what if I wrote a soundtrack but songs, you know, like old soundtracks from the '40s and '50s. They're dramatic, they have just the pieces, like that, but they're not entire songs," Setzer said. "'Wow. It'd be cool if I wrote that kind of dark swing and made them into songs.'"

So he did.

A big fan of Robert Mitchum, James Cagney and Alfred Hitchcock, Setzer gave his new CD a story line, just like those downbeat, black-and-white movies from the 1940s and '50s where the antihero is double-crossed by a femme fatale. The result is the Brian Setzer Orchestra's "Songs From Lonely Avenue," which Surfdog Records releases Tuesday in formats that include vinyl and digital download.

"I love all those movies. And the soundtracks are just so great from those movies," Setzer said during a recent interview in his Minneapolis loft. "They've got a lot of drama to them. It's real cinema. It's just hip and cool."

Sitting on his dark-brown couch, Setzer was natty in a black suit and purple polka-dot tie and had coifed his signature blond pompadour.

He casually strummed minor chords on his gleaming guitar as he explained another song, "Trouble Train," which opens "Songs From Lonely Avenue" on a foreboding note with a frenzied roar of drums, guitar and horns.

"His friends are warning him, 'Don't get on that Trouble Train.' But he's on it, he's going down all the wrong roads," said Setzer, who celebrated his 50th birthday in April with a nightclub performance by his retro-rockabilly band the Stray Cats in Minneapolis.

For his new album's horn charts, Setzer turned again to veteran Hollywood composer and arranger Frank Comstock. The previously retired Comstock worked with bandleader Les Brown and singers Doris Day and Rosemary Clooney, and his TV credits include "Adam-12," "Dragnet" and the Rocky and Bullwinkle show.

Comstock scored Setzer's 2007 jazzed-up-classic-music disc "Wolfgang's Big Night Out" and the 87-year-old was up for another spin with Setzer.

Comstock said Setzer had just one instruction when he lured Comstock out of semiretirement: "I just want you to write that way you did in 1950."

"He said, 'I just want all these fans of mine to know, around the world, that there's more than two chords in any song,'" Comstock recalled Setzer telling him.

Setzer said he "just let Frank go."

"For instance, I would say, 'Why don't we put some flutes and clarinets in here?' And he would say, 'Yeah, that's a good idea. We haven't used flutes yet.' Things like that," Setzer said. Comstock eventually arranged horn charts for nine tracks on "Songs From Lonely Avenue," helping give the CD its swinging old-school vibe.

Setzer, who grew up on New York's Long Island, moved to Minneapolis about five years ago after marrying Twin Cities native Julie Reiten, one of his backup singers (she trades vocals with Setzer on "Gimme Some Rhythm Daddy.") Setzer recorded his new CD at a friend's Minneapolis studio, using local musicians.

"It's a music town without the attitude," Setzer said of Minneapolis, whose downtown skyline is featured behind Setzer on the CD's cover.

Setzer said he's up for playing again with his fellow Stray Cats, drummer Slim Jim Phantom and standup bassist Lee Rocker. But for now, he is gearing up for his seventh annual Christmas Rocks! Extravaganza tour, which starts Nov. 20 in Detroit.

Since the Stray Cats' 1980s heyday with hits like "Stray Cat Strut," Setzer has made a second career of big-band swing and rocking Christmas songs. He says he might try to sneak in some "Songs From Lonely Avenue" on his latest holiday tour but doesn't know which ones yet.

"You know I can't go from 'Jingle Bell Rock' to 'Trouble Train,'" Setzer said with a laugh.

___


5 More Days-a-billy
Back to top Go down
View user profile
rosie

avatar

Posts : 7
Join date : 2009-08-03

PostSubject: Re: Lonely Avenue Article   Thu Oct 08, 2009 12:08 pm

an early review:
http://blogs.westword.com/backbeat/2009/10/sound_bites_ancestors_au_the_m.php

Brian Setzer Orchestra, Songs from Lonely Avenue (Surfdog Records). It's tough to tell if the tired edge in Setzer's voice is the natural result of so many years as a dynamic touring force, or an on-par inflection designed to complement these devilishly dark song-stories. Either way, the gruffness pairs well with the aerospace-engineering-tolerance tightness of the band, and the seedy underbelly of the noirish material.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Hot Rod Girl

avatar

Posts : 534
Join date : 2008-04-18
Location : Wisconsin

PostSubject: Re: Lonely Avenue Article   Thu Oct 08, 2009 1:12 pm

Since the Stray Cats' 1980s heyday with hits like "Stray Cat Strut," Setzer has made a second career of big-band swing and rocking Christmas songs. He says he might try to sneak in some "Songs From Lonely Avenue" on his latest holiday tour but doesn't know which ones yet.

"You know I can't go from 'Jingle Bell Rock' to 'Trouble Train,'" Setzer said with a laugh.


I love the fact that this guy seems to have a great sense of humor, and I'm excited that we may get to hear some of the tracks live. I can't wait to hear the album in it's entirety, I'm giddy like a little school girl!

Great article, thanks for sharing!
Back to top Go down
View user profile
mjcodina

avatar

Posts : 273
Join date : 2008-09-22
Age : 31
Location : Salt Lake City, UT

PostSubject: Re: Lonely Avenue Article   Thu Oct 08, 2009 6:37 pm

hey guys dont forget the great video on that associated press article!
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://web.me.com/mjcodina/Codinaduty/Welcome.html
Bear85

avatar

Posts : 313
Join date : 2008-08-02
Age : 50
Location : NE Wisconsin, USA

PostSubject: Re: Lonely Avenue Article   Fri Oct 09, 2009 3:31 am

Thanks to Rick for the tip on the article, and also to mjcodina - I never would have clicked the link if you hadn't mentioned the video! (although on my 'puter, I could barely hear the audio - the reporter must have shot it with a camera phone or something!)
Back to top Go down
View user profile
webelvis

avatar

Posts : 428
Join date : 2008-09-07
Age : 24

PostSubject: Re: Lonely Avenue Article   Fri Oct 09, 2009 5:40 am

Great article and Video!

Thanks Rick!
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://www.myspace.com/rockabillyswingjazz
Andi

avatar

Posts : 1474
Join date : 2008-05-16

PostSubject: Re: Lonely Avenue Article   Sat Oct 10, 2009 6:38 am

Here's the video with clean audio:

Songs From Lonely Avenue
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Gloria

avatar

Posts : 46
Join date : 2008-04-18

PostSubject: Re: Lonely Avenue Article   Sat Oct 10, 2009 7:36 am

Album review: Brian Setzer Orchestra, 'Songs from Lonely Avenue'
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
By Peter Chianca / pchianca@cnc.com
GateHouse News Service
Posted Oct 10, 2009 @ 09:21 AM
Last update Oct 10, 2009 @ 10:24 AM

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Brian Setzer doesn’t want your money. That’s the only possible explanation for all the banjo-plucking, yodeling, classical noodling and other activities guaranteed to keep his songs off the radio, not to mention most other places where people find music these days.

Setzer could have disappeared into the sunset after the Stray Cats went to that great feline rescue center in the sky, but he succeeded against all odds with his Brian Setzer Orchestra, first riding the unlikely swing craze of the mid-’90s and then with this decade’s Christmas records and tours. His most successful non-holiday effort remains 1998’s The Dirty Boogie, probably because that record stayed mostly true to his rockabilly roots while still swinging like a runaway big-band freight train.

Since then he’s experimented more – with hip-hop rhythms on Vavoom! (2000), and classical compositions on Wolfgang’s Big Night Out (2007) – and if record buyers haven’t responded as enthusiastically, Setzer certainly seems to be having a grand old time. But he takes a slightly darker turn on his orchestra’s latest, Songs from Lonely Avenue.

The first BSO album to feature all Setzer originals, the bandleader says he envisioned it as the soundtrack to an unwritten 1940s or ‘50s film noir – but listening to it, it’s not just a soundtrack. It’s the whole darn movie.

A trip down Lonely Avenue features gunfights, deals gone bad and at least one flirty moll – Setzer’s wife Julie Reiten, who on “Gimme Some Rhythm Daddy” proves herself as able a foil to Setzer as Gwen Stefani was on Boogie’s “You’re the Boss.” There’s also a thug who, on “King of the Whole Damn World,” spells out his tough-guy credo in a Runyonesque rasp. If what Setzer set out to do was create a smoky landscape of swinging toughs and jilted fall guys, he’s succeeded – in spades, as one of his characters might say.

Typical of Setzer, he’s most successful when he lets his Gretsch guitar do much of the talking, like on the steam-powered “Trouble Train” that kicks off the LP, and a pair of instrumentals, the smooth “Mr. Jazzer Goes Surfin’” and its hell-bent companion piece, “Mr. Surfer Goes Jazzin’.”

Setzer probably indulges his inner crooner once too often; “Lonely Avenue” is a fine misty wee-hours ballad, but “My Baby Don’t Love Me Blues” only accentuates the limitations of some of his moon-in-June lyrics. Turns out he makes a better Sammy than he does a Dean, as he shows on the bongo-driven two-minute swing rave-up “Love Partners in Crime.”

Setzer definitely benefits from the contributions of 87-year-old big-band arranger Frank Comstock, with whom he hooked up for Wolfgang. If the album lacks as many standouts as The Dirty Boogie, Lonely Avenue, with its darker arrangements, holds together better thematically – if Boogie brought the rockabilly power, this one brings a late-night swingtime mood that serves it well – more than on the group’s other albums, the band provides the shadings of a real orchestra, not just the bombast of 15 blaring horns.

Yes, I’m saying that Setzer can do subtle – he also shows that with the album’s closer, “Elena,” a beautiful acoustic guitar instrumental with more than a few nods to “Malaguena,” which Setzer covered in its full electric glory on Ignition! (2001). It’s a reminder that as much fun as his big band can be, a disc of Setzer guitar instrumentals would be a welcome next step for the rockabilly iconoclast. Who knows, it might even sell a few copies.

Not that he would care.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Andi

avatar

Posts : 1474
Join date : 2008-05-16

PostSubject: Re: Lonely Avenue Article   Mon Oct 12, 2009 9:03 am

Another quick blurb about Lonely Ave, this one with a weirdly angled photo.

By JENNIFER CHANCELLOR World Scene Writer

Soooo, what did the modern-day big band man do when he wanted to re-create the sounds of classic 1950s film noir music for his new album, "Songs From Lonely Avenue"?

Why, Brian Setzer joined forces with the grandfather of the genre — legendary Frank Comstock, who wrote arrangements for Benny Carter, Stan Kenton, Les Brown and Judy Garland. Comstock also penned theme songs for "Rocky & Bullwinkle," "Adam 12" and "Dragnet," and recorded the 1962 classic cult album "Project Comstock: Music From Outer Space."

The album is due Oct. 13 from Surfdog Records.

The jump blues, rockabilly, swing and big band musician may be best-known for his work with the Stray Cats — but Setzer's work as bandleader of the Brian Setzer Orchestra has won him much critical acclaim in recent years.

The Brian Setzer Orchestra will perform its greatest hits and Stray Cats and holiday classics Dec. 11 at Windstar World Casino in Thackerville. For more information, visit his official Web site at tulsaworld.com/BrianSetzer.

Back to top Go down
View user profile
Gloria

avatar

Posts : 46
Join date : 2008-04-18

PostSubject: Re: Lonely Avenue Article   Mon Oct 12, 2009 11:12 am

Here's another short review. The source:

http://www.collegenews.com/index.php?/ear_candy/guide_to_upcoming_releases_for_october_13_2009101009536/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Brian Setzer Orchestra - Songs from Lonely Avenue [Surfdog Records]

For all you hepcats and kittens out there, here’s something that really cooks. Yes, the whole retro big band sound might be long gone, but Brian Setzer doesn’t care. He’s still out there, giving his fans what they want. And, boy oh boy, does he pull it off. Songs from Lonely Avenue is described by Setzer as a “soundtrack to an unwritten film”. Listening to the album, you do have this feeling of an overall story arh. It’s not a collections of singles that are pining to get on the radio. You have to listen to the entire album in order to really appreciate it. Give it a listen. You’ll be surprised.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Arh"? Don't know what that is supposed to mean.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Andi

avatar

Posts : 1474
Join date : 2008-05-16

PostSubject: Re: Lonely Avenue Article   Mon Oct 12, 2009 11:15 am

Gloria wrote:
"Arh"? Don't know what that is supposed to mean.

"Arc," I imagine. I love the fact that everyone is pointing out how much Brian Setzer doesn't care that what he's doing isn't cool, and that makes it cool!

sunny
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Andi

avatar

Posts : 1474
Join date : 2008-05-16

PostSubject: Re: Lonely Avenue Article   Wed Oct 14, 2009 4:36 pm

Okay, this is funny as hell.

"It sounds like the sun's shining down on the tourists at Disney's Noirland."

Yeah, comparing Setzer to Morphine. That makes sense. Hahahaha!
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Andi

avatar

Posts : 1474
Join date : 2008-05-16

PostSubject: Re: Lonely Avenue Article   Mon Oct 19, 2009 10:53 am

All That's Missing Is The Movie - the Wall Street Journal gets in on the act! (nice to see the comments from WSJ readers too...click on the "comments" tab above the article)

Brian Setzer's latest big-band adventure is dedicated to the shadowy ambience and threatening tone of film noir. When we met last month at his apartment here, he was dressed appropriately in a black suit, shirt and purple tie, but his welcoming smile and big orange Gretsch guitar were in contrast to the album's theme. So was the late-afternoon sun streaming through his living-room windows.

As for "Songs From Lonely Avenue" (Surfdog) by the Brian Setzer Orchestra, the titles of some of Mr. Setzer's 13 new compositions tell us what he was going for: "Kiss Me Deadly," "Passion of the Night," "Trouble Train," "Dead Man Incorporated," "Lonely Avenue" and "Love Partners in Crime." Five trumpets and five trombones ensure a thick blast of brass, and five woodwinds supply the warmth. Then there's Mr. Setzer's guitar playing, at least as supple as it was some 30 years ago when he fronted the Stray Cats, whose rockabilly foreshadowed his taste for '50s jump blues and swing.

Now 50 years old, Mr. Setzer insists his music isn't anchored to the past. "You have to create something new with it," he told me. "The Stray Cats weren't stuck in the '50s. My style comes out of rock 'n' roll, jazz, rockabilly, a little bit of country, blues. You mix it together and you toss it over to a big band. That's what makes it new."

The major influences on "Songs From Lonely Avenue" are the film-noir scores of Neal Hefti, Elmer Bernstein, Dmitri Tiomkin and Bernard Herrmann, he said. But Mr. Setzer doesn't quote those composers; the 1955 film of the same name may inspire his version of "Kiss Me Deadly," but nowhere does he reference Frank De Vol's score. His music conjures danger-wrought images in black-and-white: an abandoned alley, a frightened little man, a blasé woman, a snub-nose .38.

Of "Kiss Me Deadly," he said, "I was thinking of a femme fatale, a woman whose emotions were like the time of year." In the song, diminished chords usher in a romance that begins in April, but then the chill of late October arrives too soon. Mr. Setzer offers an ambiguous lyric in the final verse. Did the narrator kill her before she intended to depart?

In "Dead Man Incorporated," Mr. Setzer plays a crisp bass line and vibrating chords under the horns, suggesting a man fleeing the organization in the title. After two verses in which Mr. Setzer sings of the threat the narrator faces, his deft solo extends the "man on the run" theme. Following an abrupt tempo change, we learn the narrator has been dreaming.

"I was waking up in the middle of the night with these songs," Mr. Setzer said. "They were scribbled on a page or sung into a 1970 Sears tape recorder. I had to have a song about a dream." He explained that "thinking that I was writing a soundtrack freed me up. I'd love to do a film score. I did this backwards: I wrote the music without the film." Mr. Setzer's biggest asset on the project was Frank Comstock, the veteran arranger and composer who wrote big-band charts for Les Brown, Benny Carter and Stan Kenton and scored episodes of "Dragnet," among other TV shows. Mr. Comstock, who's now 87 years old, wrote the horn charts of nine of the disc's tunes.

Mr. Setzer said that "it all starts with a guitar." He picked up the big Gretsch and played the riff that kicks off "Trouble Train." "As I was writing, I was thinking in terms of a trio setting, but then I thought, 'No, this is for a full orchestra. Horns create atmosphere.' Once the song was finished, I'd give it to Frank. He's taken them to a unique direction."

Mr. Setzer says fans of his big band still love the Stray Cats material—"they even want to hear the B sides," he said—and clamor for his guitar playing. On "Songs From Lonely Avenue," he offers a pair of numbers, "Mr. Jazzer Goes Surfin'" and "Mr. Surfer Goes Jazzin'," that allow him to flash the many colors in his playing. Backed only by drums and bass on those tunes, Mr. Setzer references Chet Atkins, Chuck Berry, Dick Dale, Duane Eddy, Joe Pass and Les Paul to create distinctive sounds of his own.

He's committed to the Brian Setzer Orchestra, which he's fronted since 1993. "I've paid the band out of my own pocket," he recalled. "It's never gotten to the point where I couldn't pay the band. I've been able to give them bonuses. If I wanted to make money, I wouldn't start up a 15-piece band. I just do what I want to do."

Mr. Setzer will take the orchestra on the road to play songs from its three Christmas albums. He said material from "Lonely Avenue" would work its way into the sets. "Come and see us," he said as he fingered his purple tie. "We'll nail you to the wall."
Back to top Go down
View user profile
sidelake bob

avatar

Posts : 681
Join date : 2008-09-08
Age : 48
Location : In the heart of Sweden

PostSubject: Re: Lonely Avenue Article   Sun Oct 25, 2009 1:48 am

Andi wrote:
Here's the video with clean audio:

Songs From Lonely Avenue

Thanks Andi.

Look at Brians 6120 hot rod guitar, The colour is not the normal candy red, Have Brian used this one on stage or is it new for the cristmas tour?
Back to top Go down
View user profile
talldave

avatar

Posts : 30
Join date : 2009-08-20

PostSubject: Re: Lonely Avenue Article   Sun Oct 25, 2009 4:00 am

Andi wrote:

"As I was writing, I was thinking in terms of a trio setting, but then I thought, 'No, this is for a full orchestra."

Mmh... I wonder if his intention was to write for a Stray Cats album...

Which has me thinking, last year when Stray Cats did the Europe/Australia/Japan tour, I was hoping they would be recording a new album.

Now? I'm so happy with SFLA I'm well glad he didn't do another Stray Cats album! No way it could have been as good as this! (MY opinion of course).
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Andi

avatar

Posts : 1474
Join date : 2008-05-16

PostSubject: Re: Lonely Avenue Article   Sun Oct 25, 2009 11:39 am

This morning I happened to stumble across a glowing early review from way back in August, when Trouble Train and Lonely Ave were released:
http://jazzuality.com/jazz-news/sneak-preview-of-the-new-brian-setzer-orchestra-album-songs-from-lonely-avenue/

Nothing new here, though this is a staggering comparison:

Quote :
"The devilish "Trouble Train" appears in propulsive rhythm, an ominous minor key and wickedly good roaring guitar, this song revisit the familiar character of the devil up to his old tricks. Speaking about train, I’ve been waiting to see another composition to meet the ageless legend "Take The A Train", and this one is a match. Not only that, but this song also echoes the other great song about Lucifer, the Charlie Daniels' masterpiece "Devil Went Down to Georgia". "Trouble Train" is simply a massive opening to set the mood for the whole album."

Comparing Trouble Train with A Train! Wow! Way to go B! Apparently I'm not the only one who hears big band royalty in this CD!


On the topic of Trouble Train, last night I saw some friends I hadn't seen in a few weeks, so I brought along the new CD to squee about. I was saying how amazing it was to have my photo on the CD of my favorite artist of all time. "Who is it?" one fella asked from across the room. "Brian Setzer," I said. "Songs From Lonely Avenue from the Brian Setzer Orchestra - it just came out less than two weeks ago." "Oh! I heard a song from that on satellite radio earlier today, driving down here from LA!" he exclaimed, "something about a train?" "Yeah! Trouble Train!" I said with excitement, "they're playing it on satellite radio?? How cool!" He smiled, "yeah! Good stuff!"

He got pulled into another conversation so I wasn't able to get any details about what station, which satellite service, etc. But it made me giddy to know that it is getting airplay, given how difficult it would be to pigeonhole it into traditional radio formatting. Anyone else hearing it anywhere on the air?
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Scatman

avatar

Posts : 206
Join date : 2008-09-19

PostSubject: Re: Lonely Avenue Article   Mon Oct 26, 2009 1:49 am

Trouble Train has been on regular rotation on Little Steven's Underground Garage on XM Radio. I didn't catch the name of the show, but it appeared to have a pre-recorded blurb about the song being "The best song of the week", a few words about the big band and the upcoming Extravaganza Tour. Quite a shocker the first time I heard it on XM, and heard it several more times throughout the week which tells me it got played several times a day..................

Ooby Dooby!
Scatman
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Andi

avatar

Posts : 1474
Join date : 2008-05-16

PostSubject: Re: Lonely Avenue Article   Sun Nov 01, 2009 7:45 am

Rockin' into the night: Brian Setzer's new album one for all generations

By JENNIFER CHANCELLOR World Scene Writer
Published: 11/1/2009 2:22 AM
Last Modified: 11/1/2009 5:36 AM

Rockabilly guitar-slinger and big-band frontman Brian Setzer is at it again. This time, he brings us "Songs From Lonely Avenue," a collection of 13 originals penned by the bandleader himself.

It's a propulsive rocket-blast from the past, and this time Setzer has partnered with the legendary Frank Comstock, who wrote arrangements for Benny Carter, Doris Day, Judy Garland, Stan Kenton and more. Comstock also penned theme songs for "Rocky & Bullwinkle," "Adam 12" and "Dragnet" and recorded the 1962 classic cult album "Project Comstock: Music From Outer Space." Comstock wrote all the horn arrangements for this rambunctious collection.

Setzer paints a vivid fantasy of colorful characters set with stunning aural contrast against rain-darkened streets and fog-haloed city streetlamps.

The rockabilly- and surf-guitar-tinged tunes practically shake with bright horns, hammering upright bass and rowdy swing. They evoke timeless images of 1950s mohair cardigans and poodle skirts, stiletto heels, pompadours, jukeboxes and leather biker jackets.

Indeed, Setzer strikes chords with music-lovers from any generation, from grandma to greaser and even the all-the-rage modern version of punk retro princesses in pink and black polka dots and their dapper, denim-wearing, racecar-mad beaus.

There are grown-up themes: love, loss, passion and partners in crime. It's a vibrant, old-school flashback that breaches nearly all music genres, eras and social strata.

It's a modern classic with pitch-perfect
melodies and apocalyptic minor keys from the former Stray Cats frontman. His guitar work is delirious, guitar-riff benediction.

The Brian Setzer Orchestra will perform its greatest hits and Stray Cats and holiday classics Dec. 11 at WinStar World Casino in Thackerville. For more information, visit his official Web site at tulsaworld.com/BrianSetzer.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Andi

avatar

Posts : 1474
Join date : 2008-05-16

PostSubject: Re: Lonely Avenue Article   Tue Nov 03, 2009 7:24 am

Another review...

Taking pages out of black-and-white gangster movies, “Songs From Lonely Avenue” tells somewhat similar tales, all concocted by the 50-year-old Stray Cats leader who strayed from rock to swing.

And swing this CD does – starting with a wild, wild ride on the “Trouble Train,” speeding down the express track. Most of the tracks are uptempo. In one exception, the swingsters go bluesy with the give-away title “My Baby Don’t Love Me Blues.”

Blue you won’t be, and a good deal of the credit goes to 87-year-old Frank Comstock, a big name in Hollywood when Setzer was a pup. He scored the music for “Dragnet” and its offshoot, “Adam-12.” He also scored the music for the Setzer horns.

“Kiss Me Deadly,” also the title of an old Mickey Spillane novel, is a standout. “Dead Man Incorporated” is another must-hear.

There are a number of swing-type bands making the rounds these days, but so far, Brian Setzer is the mob boss. Go, cats!

– Frank Roberts
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Brett

avatar

Posts : 993
Join date : 2008-09-05
Age : 52

PostSubject: Re: Lonely Avenue Article   Tue Nov 03, 2009 7:46 am

in Germany i found a workshop for guitar in a guitar mag.
They show how to play "Mr. Jazzer goes surfin",



If anybody is interested Article is in german, but tabs and notation is international.


Last edited by Brett on Tue Nov 24, 2009 11:36 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://www.facebook.com/Rhythm56
lemoncat

avatar

Posts : 10
Join date : 2009-11-06
Age : 29

PostSubject: Re: Lonely Avenue Article   Sun Nov 08, 2009 8:37 am

Brett wrote:
in Germany i found a workshop for guitar in a guitar mag.
They show how to play "Mr. Jazzer goes surfin",



If anybody is interested view my Album on myspace. Article is in german, but tabs and notation is international.
In a few days i`ll delete pics on myspace. But i could mail it... Rolling Eyes

click here


Thank you Pics!

I love this song. I love you
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Andi

avatar

Posts : 1474
Join date : 2008-05-16

PostSubject: Re: Lonely Avenue Article   Wed Nov 18, 2009 2:39 pm

http://www.reuters.com/article/musicNews/idUSTRE5AG0P820091117

By Gary Graff

DETROIT (Billboard) - Brian Setzer's new album, "Songs From Lonely Avenue," was inspired by film noir themes from the '40s and '50s. Now he'd love to see someone make a movie based on the record.

"I'd love Quentin Tarantino to take a crack at it," Setzer tells Billboard.com, noting that the album's 13 songs are "a loose storyline to a movie. It is thought-out, though. To me it could all be part of a movie."

To ensure that "Songs From Lonely Avenue" had an authentic cinematic quality, Setzer reached out to Frank Comstock, the 87-year-old arranger who worked with Judy Garland, Stan Kenton, Benny Carter and many others and also wrote the theme songs for "Dragnet," "Adam 12" and "Rocky & Bullwinkle."

"Comstock is just a hoot," Setzer reports. "He's the last one of his generation. He's a genius, up there with Nelson Riddle and all the great arrangers of his day. But he always wants to do it his way, too. We'll fight about chords. 'That chord's wrong!' 'Well, Frank, why is it wrong?'

"It just is. It doesn't make sense!' So we have our musical thing, but no one I've met can write arrangements like him. He writes around the lyrics and never steps on my singing, but the words speak through the instrument. It gives you chills."

While Setzer waits for Hollywood to come knocking for "...Lonely Avenue," he's gearing up with his Orchestra for their annual Christmas Rocks! Extravaganza Tour, which kicks off Friday in Detroit. The show will, of course, draw from his "Christmas Rocks!" album -- which is packaged with a DVD of a 2006 concert for PBS as "The Ultimate Christmas Collection" -- but Setzer says he'll be playing plenty of "...Lonely Avenue" and other non-Yule selections from his catalog.

"I didn't go out last year, so I'm really looking forward to playing this Christmas," says Setzer. "The Christmas tour now is pretty much whatever I want to do. I still do a lot of the Christmas songs, but I want to play some of the '...Lonely Avenue' stuff, Stray Cats stuff, just pick the songs I want to do now. People don't seem to mind; they just want to hear the songs."

Setzer doesn't have anything planned yet for 2010, and he's not ruling out another run of Stray Cats shows. "Y'know, I really miss the guys," he says. "I really hold that (band) dear, more now than I ever used to. I would like to play with them again. I don't know about running around places like Europe or Australia anymore, but I will play with those guys again, I don't care if it's the corner bar."
Back to top Go down
View user profile
talldave

avatar

Posts : 30
Join date : 2009-08-20

PostSubject: Re: Lonely Avenue Article   Thu Nov 19, 2009 12:02 pm

Andi wrote:


"I still do a lot of the Christmas songs, but I want to play some of the '...Lonely Avenue' stuff, Stray Cats stuff, just pick the songs I want to do now. People don't seem to mind; they just want to hear the songs."

Sounds good to me!

Andi wrote:
Setzer doesn't have anything planned yet for 2010, and he's not ruling out another run of Stray Cats shows. "Y'know, I really miss the guys," he says. "I really hold that (band) dear, more now than I ever used to. I would like to play with them again. I don't know about running around places like Europe or Australia anymore, but I will play with those guys again, I don't care if it's the corner bar."

Ditto!
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Andi

avatar

Posts : 1474
Join date : 2008-05-16

PostSubject: Re: Lonely Avenue Article   Tue Nov 24, 2009 1:05 pm

Brian Setzer finds a 'Lonely Avenue' is his latest home, Minneapolis

MINNEAPOLIS _ Everyone called the joint the Monte. The bartender poured a stiff drink and shared his gift of gab at no extra charge. He loved chatting with one of the regulars _ a guy with a pompadour as slick as a Minnesota sidewalk on Super Bowl Sunday morning.

The barkeep knew the pompadour played guitar. "You should check out my basement," he said.

One night, the guitarist found himself shuffling down a flight of rickety steps into what looked like a New Orleans bordello. The bartender lifted a hook on a door, and there it was: a cozy cavern like Tut's tomb, but with some of the coolest vintage recording gear east of the Sunset Strip.

The axman's eyes lit up. "Do you know any drummers?" he asked.

"Of course," said the bartender. "A bass player, too."

True story, more or less: Those nights at the Monte Carlo in Minneapolis led to "Songs From Lonely Avenue," a new album by former Stray Cat Brian Setzer that swings, stomps and seduces like a long-legged dame who walks into a detective's office with a request he can't refuse.

The album grew out of jams with local drummer Noah Levy and bassist Tommy Vee in bartender-turned-producer Mark Stockert's Underwood Studios. Inspired by the hard-boiled, film noir thrillers of the 1940s and '50s, the songs are fashioned like vignettes from old movies, with pulp-fiction titles such as "Kiss Me Deadly," "Love Partners in Crime" and "Dead Man Incorporated."

"I'd love to give the album to Quentin Tarantino and go, 'Can you write a film around this?'" Setzer said.

On the cover, there's Setzer, big avocado green Gretsch guitar in hand, posed atop his high-rise condo near the Monte Carlo against the Minneapolis skyline, his blond pompadour towering above it all.

The New York-born, California-based rock star moved to Minneapolis nearly six years ago after regular visits to see his new wife's family. (The former Julie Reiten, a singer from Hopkins, Minn., implores "Gimme Some Rhythm, Daddy" on "Lonely Avenue.")

"Moving to Minnesota was a breath of fresh air," Setzer said this month in his Minneapolis condo. "We were in Palm Springs (Calif.). Julie didn't want to feel like she was making me come back here. But I was making friends and going places here and I said, 'I really like it here.' I can walk down to the bar and I can talk to people. I found more often than not that we were coming here. We've been happy here."

And he has plugged into the music community.

"The best thing about Minneapolis _ these guys are just as good as any players anywhere in the world. The difference is they'd be in the middle of dinner and they'd be over in 20 minutes. You would never get that in New York or L.A. You'd get his answering machine and a call back in a couple of days and 'I'm available in a week or two.' I've never been so plugged in with local guys. You don't get that kind of camaraderie in big cities."

Drummer Levy had never met Setzer but the first concert he ever saw was Setzer's Stray Cats in the mid-1980s.

"It sounded very organic right away," Levy said of that night in Stockert's Uptown Minneapolis studio. "The energy going around the room was amazing. Who would have thought you could sound like that in somebody's basement? I knew Brian was a great guitar player, but he's a great all-around musician. He has very keen ears."

What those ears heard that night was: the soundtrack to an old crime movie.

"When I get that focus, that's when the floodgates kind of open," Setzer explained. "It takes two or three songs that sound similar: 'It's a '50s crime drama.' Now I write about the guy sneaking down the alley."

Inspired by those sessions, Setzer penned and then recorded the rest of "Lonely Avenue" in Minneapolis before heading to Hollywood to overdub strings and horns with legendary arranger Frank Comstock, 87, who'd worked on "Dragnet" and "Rocky & Bullwinkle" as well as with Judy Garland, Les Brown and Stan Kenton.

"He's the last one," Setzer said of Comstock. "All those big, old arrangers are gone _ Billy May, Neal Hefti. Besides my last album, the last thing Frank did was 40 years ago. He wrote 'Adam 12.'

"He loves to talk. He says, 'I wrote some stuff in the Army for Christmas big bands.' So he goes in the garage _ 'Little Town of Bethelem,' 'Little Drummer Boy.' I go, 'So this has been sitting in your garage since World War II?' The scores are 4 inches thick. We're going to try them (next year). It's like finding a diamond."

His 18-piece Brian Setzer Orchestra (featuring mostly California musicians) hit the road earlier this month for their seventh annual Christmas tour.

Strip away the leopard dinner jackets, the giant nutcrackers and all the tinsel, and you'll appreciate Setzer's flair for mashing up musical styles.

"My style of guitar playing mixes, obviously, rockabilly and rock 'n' roll, jazz, a little country. I just pick the sounds I like from each genre and it comes through some kind of filter system of my head and just comes out of my hands. Kind of out of boredom, really."

If it seems like this guy with the '50s pompadour and 1932 hot rod lives his life in black and white _ well, he does.

"I didn't like the music when I was growing up in the '70s. I much preferred '50s rockabilly to '70s progressive rock," he said. "Same thing with the style. In the '70s, the style was long hair and Earth Shoes. I liked cool cars, I liked to have a cool haircut. It probably came from my parents. My dad was a greaser guy with sideburns and the pompadour even into the '70s.

"I love new stuff, too," Setzer, himself a father with a 22-year-old son and daughters ages 8 and 13, hastened to add. "But I definitely have a love of the '40s and '50s stuff. It's been a consistent theme in my life. Maybe I should talk to somebody about that."
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Andi

avatar

Posts : 1474
Join date : 2008-05-16

PostSubject: Re: Lonely Avenue Article   Wed Nov 25, 2009 6:39 pm

Setzer talks Christmas music, gambling, Atlantic City, fans and baseball!

Holiday Swing

Brian Setzer’s retro swing is inspired by what else but, ah, swing. The latter swing is of the baseball playing variety, which has a huge effect on the charismatic singer-songwriter’s sonic swing.

“I’ll be watching a baseball game for three hours and then I’ll plunk around with the guitar,” Setzer explains over the phone while picking up one of his Gretsch guitars. “I’ll come up with a little guitar riff.”

Setzer recently called from Detroit for an interview with Atlantic City Weekly to preview the return of his holiday show, which will hit Atlantic City Saturday, Nov. 28, at the Trump Taj Mahal. Over the phone, Setzer delivered the opening riff to the catchy “Trouble Train,” which kicks off his latest studio album, Songs From Lonely Avenue.

The disc is a stylish film nourish offering, which sounds like the soundtrack for a classic movie. “That’s so, but there is no movie to go with what I’ve come up with,” Setzer says. “Well, not yet anyway.”

Lonely Avenue is more than a soundtrack. “If it were just that, you would hear little passages for when a guy is going down the alley,” Setzer says.

The disc is an atmospheric, nostalgic blast of songs inspired by a bygone era.

On the lighter side, there will be the usual array of Christmas tracks at Setzer’s Atlantic City show since this is the ex-Stray Cats’ seventh annual “Christmas Rocks” tour.

“That’s something I enjoy doing, but people don’t realize that doing the holiday songs wasn’t my idea,” Setzer says. “I was asked to do some songs for the [1996] film Jingle All the Way. I realized that there wasn’t a rock ‘n’ roll version of ‘Jingle Bells’ so I tried it. I didn’t think a lot of it afterward but [Los Angeles radio station] KROQ played the crap out of it. I was asked to write other Christmas songs and I had some fun with it. I’ve made some fun Christmas albums. I know that no one can sound like Bing Crosby or Dean Martin but that’s all right. I can do my own thing and that’s part of the show.”

The many hits Setzer had with the Stray Cats, such as “Rock This Town,” “Runaway Boys” and “Stray Cat Strut,” will be delivered as well.

“There’s a lot to choose from,” Setzer says. “But that’s a good thing. It’s fun no matter what we play. Sometimes I don’t think it matters what we do because people just want to come out and have a good time and hear the big band do its thing.”

Setzer embraced swing courtesy of his parents’ record collection. “Kids tend to dig into what their parents are into,” Setzer says. “I loved that kind of music ever since I was small.”

But unlike many others, who embraced other genres, Setzer refused to let go of swing or rockabilly. “I remember growing up and so many kids were into Jethro Tull and Emerson, Lake & Palmer and I just couldn’t relate to them singing about dungeons and dragons. No offense, but that’s not my thing. I found my thing and I’m just going to keep making that style of music.”

If someone becomes inspired to make a Lonely Avenue film, Setzer would be more than happy to take a hiatus to advise.

“It would be fantastic if [director] Quentin Tarantino would make the movie,” Setzer says. “But I can’t wait around for that. I have music to make.”

Setzer also can’t wait to make the trip to Atlantic City. The craps-loving performer is anxious to hit the tables.

“I’ll just put on a cap, go down and play craps,” Setzer says. “I love playing proper craps like they do in Atlantic City. In Los Angeles, they play craps with cards and I just don’t like that. I like the feel of dice in my hands.”

Unlike many of his peers, Setzer likes walking the streets of Atlantic City. “I just can’t sit in my hotel room all day,” Setzer says. “If you’re in a city like Atlantic City, you’re going to want to explore. I like to slip out to the White House. I love the tuna sub they have there. It’s so good. And then there is the place down the street from there [Angelo’s Fairmount Tavern]. That’s a great Italian place. It’s different than the Boardwalk, not that there’s anything wrong with the Boardwalk. It’s just worth going back to these places.”

Setzer is fine dealing with fans on the street. In his new hometown of Minneapolis Setzer is often spotted making the rounds.

“I’m fine with that,” Setzer says. “People often say something and it’s done in a respectful manner. But it’s funny sometimes. I was in the second row behind the dugout during the one-game playoff the Minnesota Twins played against the Detroit Tigers. When the Twins were about to win, I had to go to the bathroom. When I got up I heard a bunch of people say, ‘Sit down, Setzer!’ It wasn’t as if they were being rough with me; they didn’t want me to miss the Twins win!”

For Setzer, baseball and music go together. “Those are two things that I’m really into. A lot of people know about me and music, but baseball is important to me. I’ve written quite a few songs just sitting there watching it on the television.”
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Lonely Avenue Article   

Back to top Go down
 
Lonely Avenue Article
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 2Go to page : 1, 2  Next
 Similar topics
-
» Sargent Avenue
» Seventh Avenue - Terium
» Tenth Avenue North - Deck the Halls
» Sargent Avenue - Euphoria (full album)
» Seventh Avenue Release Date

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Hoodoo Voodoo Lounge :: All things Setzer-
Jump to: